Frequently asked questions about our home eye tests

  • How do I request a home visit?
  • Call us on 0800 198 1132 or 0800 198 1134 or use the booking request form
  • How do I cancel a home visit?
  • Call us on 0800 198 1132 or 0800 198 1134 – our team will be happy to rearrange the visit for you, if necessary.
  • Who will visit me?
  • We believe that everyone is entitled to the best possible eyecare service. You will be visited by a two-person team comprising a qualified optometrist and a customer services director. We want to build up a strong relationship with you so will ensure that you are always seen by the same team so that you can really get to know them. All our staff are highly trained and have completed background checks as stipulated by the DRB (Disclosure and Barring Service, formerly known as CRB) and POVA (Protection of Vulnerable Adults) provisions. All of our staff carry identification with them at all times.
  • Will I receive as good an eye test as if I was in the opticians?
  • Eye tests at home are thorough and carried out with all the care and attention you would expect. All the visiting opticians are fully qualified and experienced at conducting eye tests at home and come equipped with the latest mobile testing kit including our revolutionary new technology, Digitial Precision Eyecare, to ensure your glasses fit correctly. They will strive to make the visit as straightforward as possible.
  • Will I be able to get the same products as high street customers?
  • Our home visiting teams provide a service that focuses on the specific needs of the individual while also offering unparalleled value and choice. You will have access to the same offers, products and standard of care available to customers of Specsavers’ high street stores. You’ll be able to choose from 180 glasses styles during your home visit and hundreds of other Specsavers styles are available to order. Our opticians will explain exactly what’s available to you and which offer is the best value for your needs.
  • Will I have to wait a long time for my glasses?
  • Once you have chosen your glasses we appreciate you will want them quickly. We have more optical laboratories than any other care home service provider, so you will receive them in the quickest possible time. When your glasses are ready your team will visit you again for a fitting appointment.
  • Do you also offer hearing services?
  • A home visit service from Specsavers is available in selected parts of the country. In this instance, a Specsavers Hearing Aid Audiologist will happily visit you to carry out a thorough, professional hearing test in the comfort of your own home using the latest computerised equipment. The test is exactly the same high standard as you’d find in one of our hearing centres and you can have your new hearing aid fitted at home too. You can request an appointment online here or call 0800 085 7970.
  • Will my glasses be guaranteed?
  • All our frames and lenses are guaranteed against defective manufacture for 12 months from the date of delivery. Should any of our glasses need repairing (subject to normal use) we will carry out the repair free. Please contact your local team on 0800 198 1132or 0800 198 1134.
  • What are cataracts?
  • Cataracts are cloudy areas that form on the eye’s lens over time. This prevents light from passing through the lens, resulting in sight loss. Cataracts are caused by a build-up of protein on the lens and while usually age-related, they can also be congenital, a symptom of another condition or caused by an injury to the eye. Many people do not notice any symptoms, but if they do, they are likely to include: • blurred or foggy vision • colours looking different in each eye • increased sensitivity to light Cataracts can usually be treated with surgery. This is a common procedure carried out under local anaesthetic. After surgery, a new glasses prescription may be required. Those who previously had to wear glasses all the time may find that they now only need them for reading.
  • What is diabetic retinopathy?
  • Retinopathy is a disease of the retina – the light sensitive nerve tissue at the back of the eye – and is often seen in people with diabetes. Diabetes affects the retina in a number of ways, but most often it is the fine network of blood vessels that cover the retina that get damaged. Sometimes the vessels swell, get blocked or leak blood onto the retina and in other cases abnormal vessels grow on the surface of the retina. These do not supply a sufficient amount of blood to the area and are often accompanied by scar tissue. All of these conditions cause some form of visual impairment, ranging from blurring to actual loss of vision. In its early stages, diabetic retinopathy may not need any treatment. Regular eye tests will be necessary so that the condition can be monitored. In its later stages, treatment can either be by injection of medicines into the eye or by laser surgery, carried out by an optician. In some cases minor surgery may be prescribed. This is carried out under local anaesthetic.
  • What is glaucoma?
  • Glaucoma is the name for a group of eye conditions in which the optic nerve is damaged at the point where it leaves the eye, leading to impaired, tunnel vision. Because the condition often progresses slowly, it can remain unnoticed until after considerable damage has been done. Glaucoma usually occurs when the eye’s aqueous fluid cannot drain properly, due to blocked or damaged drainage tubes. This raises the pressure in the eye, which damages the optic nerve. While most glaucoma develops slowly, a less common form, known as primary angle-closure glaucoma, progresses very quickly. Sufferers experience a sudden, painful build-up of pressure within the eye, which usually causes them to seek medical advice at an early stage. Other types of glaucoma are caused by injury to the eye or are congenital. Glaucoma can be treated with eye drops, laser treatment or surgery to prevent further sight loss. The earlier the diagnosis, the less the loss to vision will be.
  • What are floaters?
  • Floaters are tiny pieces of debris in the eye’s fluid, known as the vitreous humour. As we get older, the vitreous humour changes slightly and you get small black dots or strands forming in it. These cast shadows on the retina, leading to interruptions in vision, or the impression that something is floating in front of the eye. In most cases, floaters do not cause significant problems, but they can be a sign of retinal detachment, a condition where the retina starts to pull away from the blood vessels that supply it. This is a potentially serious condition and it is therefore important for those who notice an increase in the number of floaters to see an optician straight away.
  • What is macular degeneration?
  • The macula is found at the centre of the retina, where incoming rays of light are focused. It is responsible for what we see in front of us and provides the vision we need for detailed activities, such as reading and writing as well as our ability to appreciate colour. Sometimes the delicate cells of the macula become damaged and stop working. We do not know why this is, although it tends to happen as people get older. This is called age-related macular degeneration. Because macular degeneration is an age-related process it usually involves both eyes, although they may not be affected at the same time. With many people the visual cells simply cease to function, like the colours fading in an old photograph. This is known as dry degeneration. Sometimes there is scarring of the macula caused by leaking blood vessels and this is called wet AMD. There is currently no treatment available for dry AMD, but the wet type can sometimes be helped, if it is detected early. It is therefore very important that anyone who has unusual symptoms, such as straight lines appearing to be wavy or blurring of central vision, contacts an optician as soon as possible.
  • Does Specsavers Healthcall operate in Ireland, the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands?
  • No. Specsavers Healthcall offers home visits to those who qualify for free NHS home eye tests. The NHS does not cover the Republic of Ireland or the Channel Islands. Specsavers Healthcall does not currently offer services in the Isle of Man, we will be opening in Northern Ireland in late spring.
  • How do I change the time of a home visit?
  • Call us on 0800 198 1132 or 0800 198 1134 – our team will be happy to rearrange the visit for you.
  • What do I do if I’m not happy with the service?
  • We want you to be completely happy with your purchases. If you have any concerns at all, within the first three months of purchase, we will put it right. No quibble, no fuss. However, if you would like to make a complaint or a comment, please contact the Customer Care Manager, Specsavers Optical Group, FREEPOST GU209, Guernsey, GY1 5SS. Alternatively you can contact your responsible NHS authority. Your complaint will be acknowledged within three working days and you will receive an estimate of how long the investigation of your complaint is likely to take and an offer of a discussion about this period. If your complaint relates to your sight test and you are not happy with how your complaint has been handled either by us or by your responsible NHS authority, you will be advised of your right to take your complaint to the Health Service Commissioner (Ombudsman). If your complaint relates to your glasses or contact lenses you can contact the Optical Consumer Complaints Service, PO Box 219, Petersfield GU32 9BY.